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  #1  
Old 12-22-2003, 7:03 PM
David Gold David Gold is offline
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Default Bush Wishes People A Happy Kwanza

Presidential Message: Kwanzaa 2003


19 December 2003


I send greetings to those observing Kwanzaa.


Celebrated by millions across the world, Kwanzaa honors the history and heritage of Africa. This seven-day observance is an opportunity for individuals of African descent to remember the sacrifices of their ancestors and reflect on the Nguzo Saba. Kwanzaas seven social and spiritual principles offer strength and guidance to meet the challenges of each new day.


During this joyous time of year, Americans renew our commitment to hope, understanding, and the great promise of our Nation. In honoring the traditions of Africa, Kwanzaa strengthens the ties that bind individuals in communities across our country and around the world.


Laura joins me in sending our best wishes for a joyous Kwanzaa.


GEORGE W. BUSH
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  #2  
Old 12-22-2003, 7:07 PM
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The truth about Kwanza.

Kwanza
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  #3  
Old 12-22-2003, 8:58 PM
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I wonder if Harry Potter celebrates Kwanzaa?
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  #4  
Old 12-23-2003, 12:53 PM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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Default Re: Bush Wishes People A Happy Kwanza

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gold
Presidential Message: Kwanzaa 2003


19 December 2003


I send greetings to those observing Kwanzaa.


Celebrated by millions across the world, Kwanzaa honors the history and heritage of Africa. This seven-day observance is an opportunity for individuals of African descent to remember the sacrifices of their ancestors and reflect on the Nguzo Saba. Kwanzaas seven social and spiritual principles offer strength and guidance to meet the challenges of each new day.


During this joyous time of year, Americans renew our commitment to hope, understanding, and the great promise of our Nation. In honoring the traditions of Africa, Kwanzaa strengthens the ties that bind individuals in communities across our country and around the world.


Laura joins me in sending our best wishes for a joyous Kwanzaa.


GEORGE W. BUSH






:roll:


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  #5  
Old 12-23-2003, 12:57 PM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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Ujamaa (OO-JAH-MAH) Cooperative economics emphasizes our collective economic strength and encourages us to meet common needs through mutual support.


Commie rhetoric clothed in Feathers and Animals Skins


we need to us all our

Kuumba (KOO-OOM-BAH) Creativity makes use of our creative energies to build and maintain a strong and vibrant community.


to spread the word and expose old Ron Karenga's BUNKO commie racist holiday
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  #6  
Old 12-25-2003, 6:45 PM
David Gold David Gold is offline
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Here is some more Mike. Frontpage Magazine

Celebrate Kwanza?
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  #7  
Old 12-25-2003, 8:54 PM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Gold
Here is some more Mike. Frontpage Magazine

Celebrate Kwanza?
Karanga should STILL be in PRISON,..in a dank dark cell far away form any other human beings or even sub humans.

To think that Our President who I greatly respect and appreciate would have made this gaff TWO YEARS in a ROW NOW?

I just dont understand what his staff is up to. Can they be so lax as to have missed doing ANY RESEARCH on this vile fiction?


__________________________________________________ __



* Umoja (OO-MO-JAH) Unity stresses the importance of togetherness for the family and the community, which is reflected in the African saying, "I am We," or "I am because We are."

collectivism

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Kujichagulia (KOO-GEE-CHA-GOO-LEE-YAH) Self-Determination requires that we define our common interests and make decisions that are in the best interest of our family and community.

wow..more collectivism

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Ujima (OO-GEE-MAH) Collective Work and Responsibility reminds us of our obligation to the past, present and future, and that we have a role to play in the community, society, and world.

see above

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Ujamaa (OO-JAH-MAH) Cooperative economics emphasizes our collective economic strength and encourages us to meet common needs through mutual support.

NAKED COMMUNISM
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Nia (NEE-YAH) Purpose encourages us to look within ourselves and to set personal goals that are beneficial to the community.

platitude filler

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Kuumba (KOO-OOM-BAH) Creativity makes use of our creative energies to build and maintain a strong and vibrant community.

is this where KUMBAYAH came from?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

* Imani (EE-MAH-NEE) Faith focuses on honoring the[/b] best of our traditions, draws upon the best in ourselves, and helps us strive for a higher level of life for humankind, by affirming our self-worth and confidence in our ability to succeed and triumph in righteous struggle.

thats rather nebulous isnt it :roll:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------


well its time for me to go set up the Kwanza tree and await the arrival of the Mothership :shock:
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  #8  
Old 12-26-2003, 11:40 PM
Matthew Lesko
 
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IT'S KWANZAA TIME! [Flash Player Required]
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  #9  
Old 12-27-2003, 5:47 PM
David Gold David Gold is offline
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Kwanzaa spirit making its mark
Community events and commercial tie-ins signal a higher profile for holiday.
By Bill Lindelof -- Bee Staff Writer - (Published December 27, 2003)
Shopper Linda Brim paused at the supermarket display of 13 Kwanzaa baskets as she pushed her shopping cart toward the checkout register.


While she has never celebrated Kwanzaa, Brim was pleased that her neighborhood Albertsons was selling the baskets.


"It's great," she said. "It will let African Americans know more about Kwanzaa."


Selling for $34.99, the baskets have items to celebrate the holiday, including a candleholder called a kinara, an ear of dried corn, a straw place mat, candles, a gift, an Africa-inspired doll and a booklet explaining the principles of Kwanzaa.


While momentarily curious about the display, which also included fliers for a children's Kwanzaa coloring contest, south Sacramento resident Brim had no intention of celebrating the seven-day observance, which began Friday.


"But I have friends who celebrate Kwanzaa," Brim said, before paying for her groceries at the Florin Road and Franklin Boulevard supermarket. "I celebrate Christmas."


Those who have marked Kwanzaa for years say they have noticed that the holiday is given more notice than in years past.


They point to presidential messages, commercial tie-ins and increasing numbers of community celebrations. The 2003 Kwanzaa press release from the White House wishes Americans a joyous Kwanzaa.


"In honoring the traditions of Africa, Kwanzaa strengthens the ties that bind individuals in communities across our country and around the world," President Bush's message says in part.


In corporate America, JCPenney invites customers to "Celebrate Kwanzaa" by bringing Kwanzaa clothing and props for a portrait photograph, according to the retailer's Web site.


And foodnetwork.com lists 22 Kwanzaa recipes, including chicken groundnut stew, Senegalese mafe and wild green gumbo.


The Albertsons baskets were designed by a team of African American vendors. The baskets are available at about 30 stores in Northern California, including four in ethnically diverse neighborhoods in Sacramento and Elk Grove.


Created in 1966 by black nationalist Maulana Karenga, the holiday includes a color scheme of red, green and black.


Karenga, now a professor at California State University, Long Beach, notes that Kwanzaa is a cultural holiday, not a religious one, on his Web site, officialkwanzaawebsite.org.


Kwanzaa was chosen by Karenga from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza," which means "first fruits."


As listed online, the Kwanzaa principles include:


* Umoja (unity), which means "to strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.


* Kujichagulia (self-determination): To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.


* Ujima (collective work and responsibility): To build and maintain our community together and make our brother's and sister's problems our problems and to solve them together.


* Ujamaa (cooperative economics): To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit from them together."


Leslie Campbell, director of undergraduate admissions and outreach services at the University of California, Davis, said she started celebrating Kwanzaa in about 1971 while a student at California State University, Sacramento.


Campbell, then studying black studies with other students, heard about Karenga's creation.


"We started some small efforts in Sacramento," she said. "The first celebration had about 25 people, and it grew and expanded for a number of years. I believe the first one was in the Oak Park Methodist Church."


Later, the celebrations were held in the Oak Park Community Center and the Women's Civic Improvement Center. Further expansion took Kwanzaa to Del Paso Heights and Meadowview.


"I believe it is growing to the extent that Kwanzaa products are marketed in stores -- such as cards and the candleholders," she said. "Los Angeles holds a large annual Kwanzaa parade."


Campbell said there is not an injunction against selling and purchasing items for Kwanzaa but community celebrations should be free.


"I'm not concerned that people are making money" with products, she said. "I think the principles celebrated, the bringing together of people, the sharing of culture and recognizing ancestors are the most important features for me, my family and others."


Campbell, who also celebrates Christmas, said she has an annual Kwanzaa table in her home. She also plans to attend a community event tonight called "Kwanzaa: Self Determination," at the Sam Pannell Community Center in Meadowview.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

About the Writer
---------------------------


The Bee's Bill Lindelof can be reached at (916) 321-1079 or blindelof@sacbee.com.



Community Kwanzaa celebrations


These events are free. Sponsors request that those who attend bring a dish of food to share.


Today: 6-9 p.m., at Pannell Center, 2450 Meadowview Road. Sponsored by the city of Sacramento and Wo'se Community Church.


Sunday: 3-5 p.m., at Women's Civic Improvement Club, 3555 Third Ave. Sponsored by Sacramento Area Black Caucus, Black United Fund of Sacramento Valley and All African Peoples Revolutionary Party.


Tuesday: 6-9 p.m., Children's Kwanzaa, Robertson Community Center, 2525 Norwood Ave. Sponsored by Umoja Productions.
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  #10  
Old 12-27-2003, 5:50 PM
David Gold David Gold is offline
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San Diego Union

250 gather for Kwanzaa celebration

Seven-day festival is cultural holiday


By Kristen Green
STAFF WRITER

December 27, 2003


More than 250 people gathered in Lincoln Park yesterday to celebrate the first day of the African-American holiday Kwanzaa.

Children spent the morning learning the history of the holiday at the Malcolm X Library. In the afternoon, they lit the first of seven Kwanzaa candles and celebrated into the evening with poetry readings and dance and drum performances.

The seven-day Kwanzaa festival commemorates the culture and history of African-Americans. It was established in 1966 by Maulana Karenga, chairwoman of the Department of Black Studies at California State University Long Beach, following the Watts riots in Los Angeles.

Each year, millions of people from a variety of religious backgrounds celebrate the holiday in the United States, Canada, England, the Caribbean and Africa.

Because Kwanzaa is a cultural holiday, not a religious one, it can be practiced by those of all faiths.

Yesterday, the Pan-African Association of America put on its 13th annual event, marking the first day of Kwanzaa, known as "Umoja" or unity. President Duane Bradford said he has celebrated Kwanzaa for 20 years, and it's become a comforting ritual.

"Our children have never known life without Kwanzaa," he said. Bradford, who dressed for the celebration in traditional African clothing, said the celebrations reinforce cultural pride.

The holiday is based on seven principles: unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity and faith.

Jahsun Edmonds, a 31-year-old poet who performed at the event, said he looks forward to unifying with his people at Kwanzaa. He likes "coming together to celebrate my worth as an African person."

Madeline Taylor, 36, says she attends the annual Kwanzaa celebration for her three children. The family is Muslim and doesn't celebrate Christmas, but Kwanzaa enables the members to participate in their own December festivities.

"It's a good, positive experience for my children," she said. "They get to celebrate something and not feel left out."

The name Kwanzaa comes from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza," which means "first fruits." The "first fruits" celebrations were part of African history, and date to ancient Egypt and Nubia. The modern Kwanzaa celebration builds on those historic celebrations.

Betty Guy of Escondido is just beginning to celebrate Kwanzaa and spent yesterday morning learning all about the traditions. "I wanted to really get a better understanding about why it's done," she said.

Guy returned to Lincoln Park in the afternoon to watch the African-Brazilian dance troupe. Later she was clapping as musicians from the Ivory Coast performed and drummers pounded out beats for traditional African dances.

Lavern Mustafaa, one of the emcees, said she loves how Kwanzaa is an atmosphere of celebration, thankfulness and unity.

"It's about family," she said. "It's about the next generation."
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  #11  
Old 12-27-2003, 5:59 PM
rachel rachel is offline
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Quote:
Children spent the morning learning the history of the holiday at the Malcolm X Library.
I wonder if the history included the information that the founder of Kwaanza was a convicted felon, sent to prison for torturing two young African American women with beatings, hot soldering irons and vises?
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  #12  
Old 12-28-2003, 10:47 AM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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Wo'se Community Church.

I do declare that has tp be the MOST unintelligble name for a Church I done mose ever seen there Andy

i have heard of churches with name horribly similar to the "Abysinian Baptist One World Church Of God In Christ of Oakland Caflifornia,..Amen" b

ut the Wo'se Community Church?

It does fit in SO well with "kwanza" though doesnt itr
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  #13  
Old 12-28-2003, 10:50 AM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rachel
Quote:
Children spent the morning learning the history of the holiday at the Malcolm X Library.
I wonder if the history included the information that the founder of Kwaanza was a convicted felon, sent to prison for torturing two young African American women with beatings, hot soldering irons and vises?
On a Happy albeit GOOFY note..

On the first day of Kwanza...
my childrens asked me, "mamm, what is Kwanzaa for, anyway?"

On the second day of Kwanzaa...
some lady bothered me. I cursed her out and I say "no, I don't wan't no Olan Mills pictures and quit calling here!"

On the third day of Kwanzaa...
I went out to the store. I needed beer and cigarets but they was closed, so I smashed out the windows, did a drive-by and cursed em all out.

On the fourth day of Kwanzaa...
I turned on the t.v. Young and the Restless, All of My Children, One Day to Live, and then "Oprah" at 4 o'clock.

On the fifth day of Kwanzaa...
My check came in the mail. AFDC! "Thank you Lord" I said, "come on kids, let's go to the store for some collard greens, hamhocks and some cheese."

On the sixth day of Kwanzaa...
the police rang the bell. They served a warrant, I nearly passed out! But it wa ok, som woman had said I stole her wigs, but I told em all I was gonna give em back anyway.

On the seventh day of Kwanzaa...
I poured myself a drink. I drank 40 ounces, got really full then lost my mind. I drove down the street cursing out everyone I saw. Then I bashed the Cadilac upside a Dairy Queen.

On the eighth day of Kwanzaa...
I bought a TV Guide... not much had happened. I was hungover from a bad headache from Schiltz Malt Liquor Bull. I tried to stay home and be quiet, take my nerve pills... you can just feel Kwanzaa in the air.

On the nineth day of Kwanzaa...
I painted all my nails. Two shades of purple, one shade of turquoise, throwed on some glitter, did em up real nice... I had looked good! Then I drove on down to Popeye's, bought me some chicken and I stayed home and looked at t.v.

On the tenth day of Kwanzaa...
Shoplifting was the thing. 10 Now or Laters, 9 little candies, 8 cans of tuna fish, 7 little niknaks, 6 pack of Budweiser, 5 Lee Press-On Nails, 4 pieces of gum, 3 large fries, 2 days back in jail... it was Kwanzaa, so what the hell?

On the eleventh day of Kwanzaa...
I got out on parole. I rolled a big joint, went down to church and talked all out of my head. Got happy and shouted, passed out and hollered. They called 911 and the Lord set me free! Gave my testimony, stepped on home, didn't even remember where I stayed, I woke up real hungry and confused.

On the twelfth day of Kwanzaa...
My childrens gathered around me. Lincoln, Alow vera, Gyne-Lotrimin, LemonJello, OrangeJello, Tinactin, Tempasia, KMartina, Fallopia, Shi'Thead, Shameka-Vonquishia, Salmonella, Chlamydia Champagne, Democtorius, Saskatoon, Cheeto and Skuketia...
And it had really started to feel more like it was getting near Kwanza


courtesy Shirley Q/ Liquor

somebuddy say Ujamaa ubungawa go raiders
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  #14  
Old 12-28-2003, 10:54 AM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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It appears that the nation of ANGOLA has a BANKNOTE called the KWANSA how very odd.

http://www.sympac.com.au/~gippsweb/s...hill/list.html

seem like mugmabay karenga was all down for duh MONEY all this time didnt nobody KNOW ;•)
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  #15  
Old 12-28-2003, 11:24 AM
rachel rachel is offline
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Meshuga, I know (or at least, I hope) you mean it all in fun, but I have to say that I don't think all the ghetto slang joking is productive. If I were a black woman, surfing the net and coming across this forum it would only reinforce whatever stereotypes I might hold regarding conservatives.

Personally, I can laugh at the occasional race-based joke, just as I can laugh at the occasional joke on women. But my enjoyment of each requires that the intent behind the joke be benign, and that intent is hard to read in written format.

In any case, I suspect strongly that the majority of the black people who celebrate Kwaanza do not hail from the dregs of their people, the drunks and lazies, but from those proud enough to desire a celebration all their own but who are perhaps ignorant regarding the circumstances surrounding it's inception and the background of it's inventor.
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Old 12-28-2003, 1:03 PM
Meshuga Mikey Meshuga Mikey is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rachel
Meshuga, I know (or at least, I hope) you mean it all in fun, but I have to say that I don't think all the ghetto slang joking is productive. If I were a black woman, surfing the net and coming across this forum it would only reinforce whatever stereotypes I might hold regarding conservatives.

Personally, I can laugh at the occasional race-based joke, just as I can laugh at the occasional joke on women. But my enjoyment of each requires that the intent behind the joke be benign, and that intent is hard to read in written format.

In any case, I suspect strongly that the majority of the black people who celebrate Kwaanza do not hail from the dregs of their people, the drunks and lazies, but from those proud enough to desire a celebration all their own but who are perhaps ignorant regarding the circumstances surrounding it's inception and the background of it's inventor.
O know several; black women including STAR PARKER-------- who thinks its HILARIOUS .......dere sapphiure

now of course theres p accouinting for the perceptual conundrums encountered by the under-mentated® but thats not my parrty... IS IT l

PC by default is still pc isnt it

i just cant bring mysef to be accountable for the IGGNANCE of others you dig
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Old 12-28-2003, 1:23 PM
rachel rachel is offline
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Huh? Say again?

In any case, if I came off as chiding, I apologize. But there is such a thing as not bowing to PC nonsense and there is also such a thing as crossing a line into being (unintentionally, I'm sure) hurtful. Maybe I'm being over-sensitive, but I just stated my opinion, that's all.
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  #18  
Old 12-28-2003, 6:35 PM
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Just curious.

Why are Jews so down on the very recently fabricated Holiday of Kwanzaa for Blacks when the holiday of Hanukkah is nothing more than a minor celebration for Jews? ( media elevated to prominence because of its proximity to Christmas )
At least Kwanzaa ( only 30-40 years old ) professes spirituality as opposed to Hanukkah which is only a celebration of the slaughter of Jewish enemies.
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Old 12-28-2003, 6:43 PM
rachel rachel is offline
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Oh boy...single issue alan once more tries to make every thread into a Hate Jew Fest.

Just which Jews are "so down" on Kwaanza, alan?

By the way, Chanukah is not a celebration of slaughter.

It dates back nearly 22 centuries, to the successful Jewish revolt against Antiochus IV, one of the line of Syrian-Greek monarchs who ruled the northern branch of Alexander the Great's collapsed empire. Alexander had been respectful of the Jews' monotheistic religion, but Antiochus was determined to impose Hellenism, with its pagan gods and its cult of the body, throughout his domains. When he met resistance in Judea, he made Judaism illegal.

Sabbath observance, circumcision, and the study of Torah were banned on pain of death. A statue of Zeus was installed in the Temple in Jerusalem, and swine were sacrificed before it. Some Jews embraced the new order and willingly abandoned the God and faith of their ancestors. Those who wouldn't were cruelly punished. Ancient writings tell the story of Hannah and her seven sons, who were captured by Antiochus's troops and commanded to bow to an idol. One by one, each boy refused -- and was tortured to death before his mother's eyes.

The fight to reclaim Jewish religious autonomy began in 167 BCE. In the town of Modi'in, an elderly priest named Mattathias -- in Hebrew, Mattityahu -- refused a Syrian order to sacrifice to an idol. When an apostate Jew stepped forward to comply, Mattathias killed the man and tore down the altar. Then he and his five sons took to the hills and launched a guerrilla war against the armies of the empire.

When Mattathias died, his third son, Judah Maccabee, took command. He and his band of fighters were impossibly outnumbered, yet they won one miraculous victory after another. In 164 BCE, they recaptured the desecrated Temple, which they cleansed and purified and rededicated to God. On the 25th day of the Jewish month of Kislev, the menorah -- the candelabra symbolizing the divine presence -- was rekindled. For eight days, throngs of Jews celebrated the Temple's restoration. "All the people prostrated themselves," records the book of Maccabees, "worshipping and praising Heaven that their cause had prospered."

In truth, though, their cause *hadn't* prospered -- not yet. The fighting went on for years. It was not until 142 BCE -- more than two decades later -- that the Jews finally regained control of their land. Geopolitically, that was the moment of real triumph.

But Chanukah isn't about political power. It isn't about military victory. It isn't even about freedom of worship, notwithstanding the fact that the revolt of the Maccabees marks the first time in history that a people rose up to fight religious persecution.

What Chanukah commemorates at heart is the Jewish yearning for God, for the concentrated holiness of the Temple and its service. The defeat of the Syrian-Greeks was a wonder, but the *spiritual* climax of the Maccabees' rebellion occurred when the menorah was rekindled and God's presence among His people could be felt once again.

Chanukah is the only Jewish holiday not found in the Bible and the only one rooted in a military campaign. And yet its focus is almost entirely spiritual, not physical. For example, there is no feast associated with Chanukah, the way there is with Passover and Purim, the two other Jewish festivals of deliverance. Its religious observance is concentrated on flame, nothing more. And the menorah's lights may only be gazed at; it is forbidden to use them for any physical purpose -- not even to read by.

The lack of a physical side to Chanukah is unusual but appropriate. For the Maccabees' war against the Hellenists was ultimately a war against a worldview that elevated the physical above all, that venerated beauty, not holiness; the body, not the soul. The Jews fought to preserve a different view of the world -- one with God, not man, at its center. Had they failed, Judaism would have died. Because they triumphed, the Jewish religion survived. And from it, two centuries later, Christianity was born.

(Explanation courtesy of an article written by Jeff Jacoby, which I believe I got from Townhall.com)
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  #20  
Old 12-28-2003, 7:05 PM
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funny Rachel.

The Jewish acknowlegment of Hanukkah is about the Maccabean war, pure and simple.
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